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Thread: Grip problems with Deadlift

  1. #1
    Anubis
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Any solutions to having my grip go out before the rest of me on a deadlift?

    I feel I could be pulling more weight if my hands didn't get so tired first.

    Perhaps more wrist exercises to strengthen this?

  2. #2

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Do some barbell holds and/or use a better grip (i.e. hook grip, reverse hook grip, etc.). And make sure you wear some spiffy gloves [img]tongue.gif[/img]

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  3. #3

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    switching to the mixed grip has helped me alot.
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  4. #4
    Anubis
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Thanks GqArt,

    That previous thread helped me out a lot. (I guess my lazy arse should have done a forum search first
    )

    I understand the concept behind the hook grip, but what are the mixed grips?

  5. #5

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I believe gobbla is refering to holding the bar where one hand is palm up and the other hand is palm down.

  6. #6
    Anubis
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Thanks RIP!

    I think I'm going to try the BB holds first. I assume I can do these in conjunction with any workout. I'll do them at the end of course because I don't want to shortchange any muscles.

  7. #7

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Abubis- try doing farmer's walks too. Basiclly, you grab two heavy-ass DBs and walk with them for as long as you can until your grip fails. Fun stuff.

  8. #8
    Administrator Roland Denzel's Avatar
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I've been doing farmer's walks on my off days. They've helped my grip, a lot.

  9. #9
    Anubis
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I'll have to try them. I don't know how productive I'll be around the house though. Should I just walk around in circles? lol..

    I'm kiddin' of course.. I'll have to try that out. Maybe I'll use a couple 50's? or should I start out lighter/heavier? Probably just whatever feels right for me I would assume

  10. #10
    Administrator Roland Denzel's Avatar
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I picked dbs that I could walk around with for 60 steps for 3 sets. When I get to 4 full sets, I bump up the weight. I'm currently on 80lbs dumbells.

  11. #11
    CAchief
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    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I have the same problem anubis, try mixed grip when it gets HEAVY, and don't worry, your body won't get all out of wack because one hand is turned around.

  12. #12

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I used 85's. I walked until I felt that my grip was gonna give out. I didnt actually fail and let the DBs drop cus I didnt want people to get pissed at me at my gym, lol. I did 2 sets and each set lasted about 90secs.

  13. #13
    Anubis
    Guest

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Thanks for the help guys. This is all really good information. Exactly what I needed [img]smile.gif[/img]

  14. #14

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    With the mixed grip that gobbla referred to, do you alternate each set?

  15. #15

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Originally posted by jruck37:
    With the mixed grip that gobbla referred to, do you alternate each set?
    yes, if you have an odd # of sets then you're going to be off a little, but not enough to get worked up about.

    I'm not sure if plate pinching would help out or not (holding a plate between your thumb and hand, no hooking at all).

    ***mixed grip***


    Anubis> just out of curiosity, do you do BB bent over rows and weighted pullups\chins?
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  16. #16

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    I do, and I believe you should to keep things balanced.

  17. #17

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Grip Training Interview from my recent cbathletics.com newsletter:

    3 - Strong Grip for Strong Lifts & Big Arms

    Anthony Belza is now a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist in Toronto after spending several years playing in the East Coast Hockey League. During his professional hockey career, Anthony spent his off-seasons searching for ways to get stronger. And being an East Coast League "Tough guy", Anthony knew that grip strength was a top priority just as it is for many sports (even though it is one of the most neglected aspects of sports training).

    In this interview, Coach Belza will share some of his grip training secrets for athletes and lifters that want stronger deadlifts, more chin-ups, and bigger biceps.


    CB: Why should athletes and other lifters train their grip strength?

    Anthony Belza:
    Athletes should perform grip training because simply put a functionally strong person has a strong grip and functional strength is important to sport success.

    A weak grip is a like a weak link in the chain. While it might not be the most important link it is certainly the one that might make the difference on whether or not you can use that strength.

    A bodybuilder who is looking to gain size will eventually need to increase the weight that he uses he wants to keep making gains in hypertrophy. An increase in grip strength will enable him to handle more weight in any upper body exercise.

    As for the average Joe, the same truth applies but they will also be able to better apply their strength to daily tasks. This may seem trivial but I can guarantee that any one who focuses some time on their grip training will be amazed at how many tasks become easier or even possible.


    CB: Won't biceps curls and shrugs be enough?

    AB:
    No. Simply assuming that your grip is getting sufficient training by holding barbells and dumbells during weight training is not enough.

    If you encounter someone who has exceptional grip strength who tells you this is how they achieved it, they naturally had a strong grip to begin with.

    First of all, conventional weight training neglects finger strength which is vital for achieving an overall strong grip. Grip strength is in fact specific to the task for which it is necessary. Therefore someone who may seem to have a crushing handshake may lack pinching strength or thumb strength. In order to develop first class hand strength specific exercises are necessary.

    As for the aforementioned exercises, performing the bicep curls with thick handled dumbbells would be a more appropriate grip exercise. As for the shrug, anyone who has trained in a commercial gym knows that trainees require or at least love to load up an extremely heavy bar to hit their traps, but in turn they use straps to accommodate for their inability to grip the bar. The use of straps will weaken your grip over time but I have seen benefits of heavy shrugs and pulls without straps in improving grip strength.


    CB: Does your grip suffer if you use straps?

    AB:
    Certainly, and for the unaware it may be a vicious surprise. I once witnessed a hockey player who trained with straps all summer find it next to impossible to handle opponents in the corner because of a complete loss of his once powerful grip.


    CB: What are the best ways to train grip? What tools should we use?

    AB:
    This question would require a lot more space than we have room for here. But I think the following ways are great ways to insure a powerful grip.

    You can add a grip implement to the end of your workout and also consider a specific workout dedicated to your hand strength.

    On the days where you add some grip at the end, choose two to three implements or exercises and complete 3-4 sets per exercise. I would suggest never training your grip to failure for the most part. Like any other body part, your progress will eventually take a dip and you risk nagging injuries that make all weight training a drag.

    If you are using holds you can go for time, attempting to lengthen the time with each workout. Eventually you would add weight.

    You might look at your grip as forearm strength, hand strength and finger strength. Choose an exercise for each one.

    At a recent Elitefts.com seminar Jim Wendler emphasized the importance of finger strength as a key to the hand strength necessary for the bench press and deadlift. Ironmind makes a great device known as the titan telegraph that allows you to isolate the fingers and add resistance depending on how many fingers you are training at once.

    For the most part I would say you can cover a lot of ground with a wrist roller, a thick bar, some hex dumbbells, towel holds and some form of elastic or rubber ball to train the fingers in both directions.

    If you are seriously interested in ungodly hand strength I suggest getting familiar with www.ironmind.com and read anything by John Brookfield.


    CB: What if someone only has the basics, like dumbbells? What can they do?

    AB: If some one only has dumbbells that can still do quite a bit:

    Here is a list of possibilities:

    Hex DB pinch grip (pinch the upended hex for time)

    Heavy DB holds (one can create a thick handled DB by holding two smaller DB's in the same hand. This may be challenging depending on hand size. The dumbbells can also be made thicker with layers of tape, foam or a towel. The user can get creative here)

    Towel holds (wrap the dumbbell in a towel and pinch the towel for time.)

    Dumbell swings with fingers (by gripping the db with the last fingers, 3, 2, or 1, and swinging the db. Resisting the momentum becomes very challenging. This would be done in a forward/bckd motion to the side of the body or bent with db between legs.

    Off set Db exercises. (hold the db's the outside of the center and attempt to keep them upright)

    Db catch n toss. (over a mat of outdoors away from feet catch the db by the hex and toss back and forth from hand to hand.)

    With a sturdy piece of wood and a length of rope a wrist roller can be easily fastened to a Db to be used to blast the forearms.

    CB: Can you give us any sample workouts for hockey players?

    AB:
    Here is a grip workout I designed for a junior hockey team.

    Select two grip exercises from each group. You may repeat the exercises over the summer as your available equipment may limit your options. Use the wrist roller every second grip session. This is easy to make, just get some pipe from the harfware store and a length of rope. Don't use a hockey stick"

    Wrist Roller 60 sec
    Radial/Ulnar flexion extension 10 ea hand
    Plate pinch 10 sec-rest 3 sec-repeat 3*ea hand
    Towel hold w resistance same as plate pinch
    Tennis ball squeeze 30ea hand

    *repeat for 3 sets.


    CB: Thanks Anthony. If any reader has a hockey-specific question, please send it in and I'll make sure that Anthony receives it.

  18. #18
    Anubis
    Guest

    Grip problems with Deadlift

    Originally posted by gobbla:


    Anubis> just out of curiosity, do you do BB bent over rows and weighted pullups\chins?
    Right now I do one arm DB rows. At times I'll do an underhand grip bent over row with a barbell. Currently my pullups are not weighted. I only use my body weight.

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