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Thread: Deadlift on plate

  1. #1

    Deadlift on plate

    I use a weighted barbell for the deadlifts in phase 2 (while standing on a plate). I use the weighted barbell bc the olympic bar at the squat rack is always in demand and I'd feel bad hogging it for the whole time I need it.

    Anyhow, since the rubber weighted, hexagonal ends of the barbell are smaller in diameter than plates, the bar already comes closer to the ground on the descent of the deadlift than an olympic bar with plates would.

    If using a weighted barbell, is it still necessary to stand on a plate? I can see how this adds an extra inch if using an olympic bar but with the barbell I already get a good range of motion with the ends being smaller. I HAVE been doing the deadlifts on the plate but don't find that it adds anything.

  2. #2
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    Deadlift on plate

    I think you're fine using the plain bar from the ground. The point is just to get more ROM than you would normally for a DL.
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  3. #3

    Deadlift on plate

    I don't think the plate is really there for increased range of motion. Increased range of motion on a deadlift doesn't even make all that much sense.

    I think the reason for the plate is really just to get up high enough so that the foot of the trailng bent leg up in the air doesn't hit the ground. The additional height is needed because doing deadlifts with that much knee bend puts you down to the floor.

    I actually see this as a hybrid deadlift/squat motion. It's a deadlift because of the hip hinge, but the motion of the legs is a single-leg squat pattern.

    It's very similar to this:

    [youtube]Py58wHbekjA[/youtube]

  4. #4
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    Deadlift on plate

    I thought we were speaking of a conventional DL done from a platform, step or plate with a barbell. I didn't read the OP as speaking of the 1-leg (King) DL that we've discussed in other threads. If that is what was being referenced, ignore my post.
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  5. #5

    Deadlift on plate

    LisaS is correct. I'm talking about the deadlift done from a plate. This is for Phase 2 of NROL4A, Day 1 workout.

    I've been thinking about this....should I switch to using the olympic bar and large plates and then stand on the plate for increased range of motion? Or just do the deadlift with the barbell with rubber hexagonal ends from the floor?

    Would the effects differ with the different pieces of equipment? I know the "Real" way to do it would be to use the olympic bar and add plates. But logistically in the gym its better for me to grab the weigthed barbell bc its hardly ever in use while the squat rack is always in high demand.

  6. #6
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    Deadlift on plate

    Can you do a deficit DL with 135# - that is, with the 45# plates on (plus any extra weight)? If so, I'd probably do that. Or if you have training plates available use those and a lesser load.

    If you're talking about using the bar and something like the smaller diameter 25# weights, then you wouldn't be using a platform either, but just pulling from the ground to be the deficit. If it is really spatially inconvenient to use the bar vs. the fixed bars - and there is a suitable (like 90#) fixed weight bar available, then I'd do that from the floor until I was ready for the big wheels. But that's just me.
    Approach with caution - I'm keto-adapting

    WARNING: Written in minutes and fact-checked in seconds via Google. May contain unsafe levels of self-righteousness. Past cleverness is no guarantee of future results.

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    "Please! One piece of pie won't make the difference and there's plenty of time to catch up! Each individual piece of pie is totally worth it."

  7. #7

    Deadlift on plate

    Right now Im using the 95 lb weighted barbell. There is also 105 and 115 lbs.

    But as I started composing this response it occured to me that maybe I'm using the wrong type of deadlift.

    I have to go you tube deadlift vs Romanian deadlift. Phase 2 calls for a regular deadlift on a plate.

  8. #8

    Deadlift on plate

    Quote Originally Posted by "amz155":2nn833nl
    Right now Im using the 95 lb weighted barbell. There is also 105 and 115 lbs.

    But as I started composing this response it occured to me that maybe I'm using the wrong type of deadlift.

    I have to go you tube deadlift vs Romanian deadlift. Phase 2 calls for a regular deadlift on a plate.
    Hmmm. I you tubed the two types of deadlifts and I was using the right type. But I was going down too far on the descent. I was squatting down until my butt/thighs were parallel to the floor or even dipped the butt even lower. I guess this was because I was doing the DL on the plate with the hex ended barbell (which is low enough to the ground on its own) instead of the olympic bar with plates which would have stood higher off the groud to start.

    Also, is the main difference btwn a conventional DL and the RDL the fact that with the DL, the utt/thighs come down lower on the descent?

  9. #9
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    Deadlift on plate

    The DL pulls from dead stop on the floor and continues until you are upright. You then lower along the same path to return to the starting position on the floor. If you are doing reps rather than singles, you repeat the pull from the floor. If you look at any videos of powerlifting events, this is the DeadLift.

    The RDL starts from the top, you hip-hinge (drive your butt back) and this lowers the bar. When you get to the end of the hinge usually the bar is just below your knees - to go lower you'd have to bend your knees - at that point, you drive back up by extending the hip.
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  10. #10

    Deadlift on plate

    Ah ok. So with the deadlift, if I'm doing 8 reps, the bar (well, plates or hex ends in my case) should actually touch the floor at the end of each rep, not stopping on the floor but touching it and then pulling back up?

  11. #11

    Deadlift on plate

    A CDL comes to a dead stop on the floor. It then starts from a dead stop. You don't "bounce" off the floor.
    Jane

    "Knowing that you would have wanted it this way, I do believe I'm feelin' stronger every day" Chicago

  12. #12
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    Deadlift on plate

    You can have a look at this guy - not perfect DL form but you can see what needs to be seen. He's doing a deficit deadlift - not by standing on anything but by using the smaller plates. He's doing sets of 3 - so you can see how he lowers the bar, lets it come to a stop and then starts again for the next rep.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-gMUNGMSkI
    Approach with caution - I'm keto-adapting

    WARNING: Written in minutes and fact-checked in seconds via Google. May contain unsafe levels of self-righteousness. Past cleverness is no guarantee of future results.

    Training Log

    "Please! One piece of pie won't make the difference and there's plenty of time to catch up! Each individual piece of pie is totally worth it."

  13. #13

    Deadlift on plate

    Quote Originally Posted by "amz155":1ekigiwl
    Also, is the main difference btwn a conventional DL and the RDL the fact that with the DL, the utt/thighs come down lower on the descent?
    Lisa explained it well. Really the difference is that a dead lift requires taking the weight down to the floor. RDL just down to the knees or so.

    Many people lack the ankle and hip and hamstring mobility to do a pure deadlift (locked knee angle, butt up) from the ground without rounding their lumbar spine. Thus, there's kind of an awkward move bringing the weight from the floor up to the point where you can do a pure hip hinge deadlift. Some people lift a little with their knees. Some round their back.

    The RDL eliminates that because you are only working in a range that can be done with a pure hip hinge and fixed knee angle. Many people would be better off raising the weight up to the that point on risers rather than round their backs and hurt themselves. IMO, the number one bullet point in a deadlift is keeping a neutral spine. If you can't do that, you've got too much weight on the bar and/or are trying to take the bar lower than you can safely.

  14. #14

    Deadlift on plate

    The difference between a CDL and an RDL is that with a CDL you PULL from the floor and return the weight to the floor before your next rep. With a RDL, the weight is in your hands.

    With a CDL, your knees are not locked, rather they look like the below RIGHT image:

    Jane

    "Knowing that you would have wanted it this way, I do believe I'm feelin' stronger every day" Chicago

  15. #15
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    Deadlift on plate

    ^^ she means far right image is a conventional DL
    Approach with caution - I'm keto-adapting

    WARNING: Written in minutes and fact-checked in seconds via Google. May contain unsafe levels of self-righteousness. Past cleverness is no guarantee of future results.

    Training Log

    "Please! One piece of pie won't make the difference and there's plenty of time to catch up! Each individual piece of pie is totally worth it."

  16. #16

    Deadlift on plate

    Good info.

    So by using a weighted barbell (with rubber hex ends) instead of an olympic bar with round plates, the barbell will require me to come down farther in order to rest the bar on the groun than the olympic bar would since the diameter of the hex ends is less than those of the plates. To me that means that if I choose to use the barbell instead of the conventional olympic bar that I don't need to stand on a plate to get more range of motion since I'm already getting more ROM by having to lower farther with the weighted barbell....correct? I may be better off using the conventional deadlift done with conventional equipment but sometimes its more worth my time to just use what I can rather than wait 20 minutes for the rack to free up.

  17. #17

    Deadlift on plate

    You are correct.

    Thanks, Lisa.....glad you caught that! I fixed my post!
    Jane

    "Knowing that you would have wanted it this way, I do believe I'm feelin' stronger every day" Chicago

  18. #18

    Deadlift on plate

    From a functional standpoint, the Romanian deadlift and a conventional deadlift are identical movements. The RDL is simply the portion of the deadlift from the weight being at roughly knee level to lockout at the top. From that position, the angle of the knee/lower leg/floor should not change at all. The entire lift is done by changing the angle of the upper leg, hips, and back -- a hip thrust. This is the complete opposite of a squat which is done by hinging at the knees with very little (if any) change in the angle of hips.

    Notwithstanding pencil drawings on the cover of books, many people do not have the anatomy to go from the RDL position down to the floor without bendng the knees (and leg pressing the weight up to the knees) before beginning the actual deadlift motion (hip thrust). Or, even worse, bending the lower spine and lifting the first few inches with the back.

  19. #19

    Deadlift on plate

    Either you are very confused or I just simply do not understand you whatsoever.
    Jane

    "Knowing that you would have wanted it this way, I do believe I'm feelin' stronger every day" Chicago

  20. #20
    butterbeean
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    Deadlift on plate

    By the way, the Deadlift on Plate move being discussed should be done with a wide grip for this phase.

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