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Thread: Phase I Elevated Planks

  1. #1
    stiltryn0911
    Guest

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    I don't understand how you can take a rest/pause for a second or two without taking your feet off bench or ball when doing these planks. When I just lowered my body to pause, it seemed to put more stress on my back. Are there any videos of this move?

  2. #2

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    One of the easiest ways in any plank to take a couple seconds rest is to hinge at your hips, forming a bit of a tent - butt up. Then lower back to a straight plank position when ready.

  3. #3
    stiltryn0911
    Guest

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Got it. Then think of that. Thanks.

  4. #4
    stiltryn0911
    Guest

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Quote Originally Posted by "Aoife":32juraya
    One of the easiest ways in any plank to take a couple seconds rest is to hinge at your hips, forming a bit of a tent - butt up. Then lower back to a straight plank position when ready.
    Okay this works okay for the regular elevated plank but for the side plank, I think I'm better off doing it in 45 to 90 seconds. Taking a rest pause between 10 second intervals is uncomfortable. Can't keep balance on the ball so that's out of the question and it just feels like my feet are up to high on the bench when doing the side plank with a rest pause. Any other suggestions would be great.

  5. #5

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    I just held it for 90 seconds. In the beginning, I think I could only hold it for 30? so took a short break (probably 30 seconds) then did another 30. Not exactly following the program but it worked for me.

  6. #6

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Quote Originally Posted by "Aoife":305wx5kw
    One of the easiest ways in any plank to take a couple seconds rest is to hinge at your hips, forming a bit of a tent - butt up. Then lower back to a straight plank position when ready.
    On my first set of elevated planks, I tried both lowering my knees to the ground and alternatively "forming a tent" for the rest position and found both quite painful on my lower back. After the 10th rest period, I decided that I should probably try something else and came up with a bosu ball idea. So on my second set, I placed my bosu ball strategically below where my knees would touch down and found it helped alleviate the pain on my lower back during the rest period. I am not sure if this changes the intent of the excercise. Does it?

    My biggest challenge is the rest period for the side elevated planks. On my first set, I tried to find a rest position that was tollerable and didn't twist me out of form and was unsuccessful. As a result of this experimental rest location, I exacerbated my lower back issue immensely. When I attempted to do my second set, the pain in any half-assed rest position was so excrutiating, I collapsed onto the ground a layed there hoping at some point I could get up on my own accord. It took a while but I was able to get up and iced my lower back.

    I know, I know....If it hurts - DON'T do it and I did stop....

    What I am wondering is:
    [ol]
    [li]Are the rest periods an important feature of the excersice?[/li]
    [li]Can I leave them out entirely or does that change the purpose of the excercise?[/li][/ol]To be clear, I can hold a front plank 3 x 120sec and a side plank 3 x 60sec without collapse or excruitating pain. It is the twisting of my hips/pelvis/lower back that is maiming me.

    C

  7. #7

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    I just this morning realized I'd been doing this "wrong". I was taking 10 seconds rest between reps. This morning it took between 3-6 seconds to "reset". I bend my knees go into a quick "child pose" and back into the plank. Side planks are a little tougher. Just switching from side to side is all the "rest" I allowed myself.

    My biggest worry was keeping count. I had a pencil in my hand and made a tally mark with each "rep".

  8. #8
    stiltryn0911
    Guest

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Quote Originally Posted by "Civil69":2ppkjzac
    On my first set of elevated planks, I tried both lowering my knees to the ground and alternatively "forming a tent" for the rest position and found both quite painful on my lower back. After the 10th rest period, I decided that I should probably try something else and came up with a bosu ball idea. So on my second set, I placed my bosu ball strategically below where my knees would touch down and found it helped alleviate the pain on my lower back during the rest period. I am not sure if this changes the intent of the excercise. Does it?

    My biggest challenge is the rest period for the side elevated planks. On my first set, I tried to find a rest position that was tollerable and didn't twist me out of form and was unsuccessful. As a result of this experimental rest location, I exacerbated my lower back issue immensely. When I attempted to do my second set, the pain in any half-assed rest position was so excrutiating, I collapsed onto the ground a layed there hoping at some point I could get up on my own accord. It took a while but I was able to get up and iced my lower back.

    I know, I know....If it hurts - DON'T do it and I did stop....

    What I am wondering is:
    [ol]
    [li]Are the rest periods an important feature of the excersice?[/li]
    [li]Can I leave them out entirely or does that change the purpose of the excercise?[/li][/ol]To be clear, I can hold a front plank 3 x 120sec and a side plank 3 x 60sec without collapse or excruitating pain. It is the twisting of my hips/pelvis/lower back that is maiming me.

    C
    My point exactly. What is the reasoning or gains with the rest pause. Everything you are saying is on point to what I have been feeling. What is the point or rest pause on a side elevated plank?

  9. #9

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Quote Originally Posted by "Civil69":1jgya8z5
    [*]Are the rest periods an important feature of the excersice?[*]Can I leave them out entirely or does that change the purpose of the excercise?[/LIST]I can hold a front plank 3 x 120sec and a side plank 3 x 60sec without collapse or excruitating pain. It is the twisting of my hips/pelvis/lower back that is maiming me.

    C
    Good morning, I was hoping someone would chime in and comment on the rest periods when doing elevated planks. In essence, i am looking for a way to do the elevated planks without twisting my hips as I lower my knees or raise my butt to obtain a "rest" position.

    I am planning on doing my second workout of phase 1 today and was hoping either to leave the rest periods out or alternatively use options that experienced lifters may have used that reduces/eliminates the tweaking in my lumbar region.

    I really want to progress without ending up as a ball of goo on the floor due to lower back pain.

    Thank you in advance

    C

  10. #10
    chill99
    Guest

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Not much of an answer, but what I do is on the front planks I just let my hips sag for a few seconds, then snap back into position. I've had significant back issues and this doesn't seem to be a problem.

    For the side planks, I just do a full 30, 60, or 90 secs. I never could find a reasonable way to take a break and trying to seemed to defeat any feeling of benefit. I think its probably a minor issue in the overall scheme of things.

  11. #11

    Phase I Elevated Planks

    Quote Originally Posted by "chill99":3s6zwb89
    Not much of an answer, but what I do is on the front planks I just let my hips sag for a few seconds, then snap back into position. I've had significant back issues and this doesn't seem to be a problem.

    For the side planks, I just do a full 30, 60, or 90 secs. I never could find a reasonable way to take a break and trying to seemed to defeat any feeling of benefit. I think its probably a minor issue in the overall scheme of things.
    Thank you for the response.

    I have decided to forgo any rest position entirely. I am just glad do not experience the crippling pain with doing the full time sets. I will progressively increase my time and stabilization - which I think is better than nothing. Being so gibbled and on a steady diet of anti inflamatories/analgesics for days is not worth exacerbating whatever is wrong with my back.

    I don't want to feel discouraged and defeated anymore....

    C

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