Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Help with SL RDL's.

  1. #1

    Help with SL RDL's.

    Can someone recommend a video on this move? I've never been good at it and going through Abs again. I've managed to avoid them for a LONG time. I see in the book the dumbbell is held in a neutral grip but that is awkward for me for some reason. Holding it overhand it ends up in front of me too much I think. I need some coaching cues maybe too. My working knee bends - is that okay or should it stay completely straight? I'm not feeling this exercise in my hamstrings or glutes like I think I should.

  2. #2

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    What really helped me with the single leg RDL was doing them w/kettlebells. Specifically, the KB's come to a dead stop on the floor, just like with a conventional DL. I haven't done SLRDL's with dumbbells or a barbell ever since I discovered this, either.

  3. #3

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    How about Neghar Fonooni?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IbyTC6B2Oo

  4. #4

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    And notice that Neghar bends her working leg. It's just about impossible not to, if you want to keep your center of gravity over your working foot. See also Tony Gentilcore's blog post about the single leg RDL. He recommends some knee flexion in the working leg in his Key Point #3.

    It's a difficult exercise for me, as I seem to have some balance issues. I learned them as part of a progression towards the kettlebell swing in a DVD set from Gray Cook & Brett Jones, "Kettlebells from the Center - Dynami." One of the cues they emphasize is keeping the lats engaged, by keeping your upper arms close to your sides. When I made that one of my primary cues, I noticed significant improvement in my performance of the movement.

  5. #5

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Love Neghar, of course! I also notice she is using 2 KB's rather than 1 or 1 dumbbell. Does that change the exercise and/or is that what makes it easier? I did notice the dead stop on the floor. Looks like you get a second to catch your balance, but that wouldn't work with a dumbbell. And the non-working leg (the one coming off the floor) also returns to a stop in between reps. Does any of this go against the spirit of Abs (meaning will I lose any intended core challenge doing them with this model?)

    I like the idea of the KB though. That might help the awkwardness of the dumbbell placement for me. But I only have access to them for another month when I go back to my regular gym full time, so I do need to figure out how to do this with a dumbbell eventually.

  6. #6

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Tony's video helped too. He's not concerned with the dumbbell being perfectly parallel or perpendicular to his body. In fact, it's even angled slightly in a naturally held position, keeping it closer. I wish I could see what his other arm was doing but it does look somewhat close to his body - not straight out like I was trying to do for an attempt at balance.

  7. #7

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    I've been doing these in front of the mirror at my gym and treating them like the stretches/balance poses in yoga with oppositional movement. My hamstrings are really tight and I'm not that flexible so I can't touch the dumbbell to the floor and I definitely have to keep flexing in the stable knee. When I'm dropping my arm down and lifting the leg up, my mind is really focusing on my stable leg particularly on the hinge that it creates when I stop and come by up. I also don't rest my free foot on the floor after straightening backup, just a little tap if I need balance adjustment. Dunno if this is correct or not, but I certainly feel the burn in my butt on the stable leg side.

    Btw, ww4life, does your user name refer to weight watchers? I lost my weight (60-ish lbs) doing nothing but following the points program some 5 years ago and have kept it off. Now that I'm lifting and trying to get more precise with my macros (specially trying to amp up my protein) I've switched to counting calories, but I feel that the knowledge and discipline I learned through WW is making all the difference. I recommend it to folks all the time.

  8. #8

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Quote Originally Posted by "ww4life" post=1006742
    Love Neghar, of course! I also notice she is using 2 KB's rather than 1 or 1 dumbbell. Does that change the exercise and/or is that what makes it easier? I did notice the dead stop on the floor. Looks like you get a second to catch your balance, but that wouldn't work with a dumbbell. And the non-working leg (the one coming off the floor) also returns to a stop in between reps. Does any of this go against the spirit of Abs (meaning will I lose any intended core challenge doing them with this model?)

    I like the idea of the KB though. That might help the awkwardness of the dumbbell placement for me. But I only have access to them for another month when I go back to my regular gym full time, so I do need to figure out how to do this with a dumbbell eventually.
    I think using 2 KBs or dumbbells would change the exercise since you wouldn't have the offset you would with just one. It also seems that with a kb, all the weight is below your arm whereas with a dumbbell it's off to the sides. What if you grabbed a dumbbell by the head and tried it that way? Grip would be different - possibiy more challenging.

    Another thing to consider is to do wall assisted SLDLs until you feel ready to move up?

  9. #9

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Quote Originally Posted by "stingo" post=1006750
    I think using 2 KBs or dumbbells would change the exercise since you wouldn't have the offset you would with just one.
    Yep.

    In the progression I'm doing from Cook & Jones' "Dynami," the version with two KBs precedes the contralateral one-KB version. Cook & Jones refer to the two-KB version as being like "training wheels" for the contralateral one-KB version, since -- disregarding the total amount of weight lifted for the moment -- it's easier because you don't have the anti-rotation aspect of the one-KB version.

  10. #10

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Quote Originally Posted by "sula" post=1006747
    I also don't rest my free foot on the floor after straightening backup, just a little tap if I need balance adjustment. Dunno if this is correct or not, but I certainly feel the burn in my butt on the stable leg side.
    This is exactly how I do it, or try to do it (sometimes I lose it at the top and have to set my free foot on the floor).

    I've seen it done various ways, though. Gray & Cook say it's okay to set your free foot on the floor at the top, but I think that's because they want to emphasize the glute & hamstring activation and de-emphasize the balance component of the exercise. On Youtube, I've seen versions where the free foot never touches the floor, versions where the free foot lightly taps the floor, and versions (such as with Neghar) where the free foot comes to a stop on the floor. My copy of NROL for Abs is in a box somewhere, so I can't look up how it's taught there.

  11. #11

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Sula - Yes, that ww is for Weight Watchers. I lost and have kept off 60+ myself for 9 years now with WW, and I've been a meeting leader for the last 5 years! I don't track points so much anymore as I"ve learned to maintain intuitively, but I still think for the majority of people looking to change eating habits in a way their can manage and live with forever, it's the best program going. Congrats on your weight loss!

    And for everyone else - thanks for the help. This gives me some more direction. The book actually says not to put the non-working foot on the floor as I recall, maybe tapping it briefly is okay for quick balance regain. They come up again on Thursday so I'll see how it goes then. I don't want to use two dumbbells or KB's since the reason I went back to this program is because of a back muscle issue and general imbalances that I am trying to correct. I'm planning to do the program as written unless there is a really good reason not to. I must have done something right yesterday because the hammies are yelling at me a bit today

  12. #12
    Senior Member davetropeano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Greensburg, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    672

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Using 1 KB does change the exercise because you now have an imbalanced load on one side.

    Not only that but there are 2 versions of the 1 KB/DB 1-legged RDL

    1. KB is on the side of the working leg (contralateral)
    2. KB is on the side of the non-working leg

    The RKC folks tend favor option #1 (at least they did 3-4 years ago when I was introduced to the single KB 1-legged RDL) while NROL4A has #2 in the program.

  13. #13

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Quote Originally Posted by "davetropeano" post=1006857
    Using 1 KB does change the exercise because you now have an imbalanced load on one side.

    Not only that but there are 2 versions of the 1 KB/DB 1-legged RDL

    1. KB is on the side of the working leg (contralateral)
    2. KB is on the side of the non-working leg

    The RKC folks tend favor option #1 (at least they did 3-4 years ago when I was introduced to the single KB 1-legged RDL) while NROL4A has #2 in the program.
    Uh, isn't it the other way around? Contralateral means the KB is held on the side opposite (contra to) the working leg (KB same side as non-working leg, i.e. the leg that swings back and is extended behind you). Ipsilateral means on the same (ipsi) side as working leg.

    NROL for Abs has the contralateral version. I don't know what official RKC recommendations are, but Master RKC Brett Jones and Gray Cook (an RKC himself), in "Kettlebells From the Center - Dynami" (which I keep referring to because I'm following its progressions) go directly from the double KB single-leg RDL to the contralateral single-leg RDL (with Cook saying explicitly that there is no need to do the ipsilateral variant).

  14. #14
    Senior Member davetropeano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Greensburg, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    672

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Looks like I got my contra- and ipsi- mixed up. Apologies.

    It also looks like I missed a couple of the posts here since my comment (prefix gaff aside) was basically already covered.

    It was one of those days


    Interesting aside -- I don't have Dynami but Brett was the actually the person that programmed 1 legged RDLs for me back when I first started with KBs. I remember asking Brett if this was just for me based on my imbalances and he said no... the 'normal' RKC progression was to do the RDL with the working side only.

    My notes seem to agree with my memory -- although that might not be saying much. Anyway, this might be an area where there's been rethinking and change on Brett's part and the overall RKC/SFC. Or it could be a question of emphasis.

  15. #15

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    What is the benefit of one over the other (ipsi vs. contra)? I'll stick with the book version though I admit sometimes I have gotten confused and held the weight on the same side as the working leg before I realized it, hoping no harm done. But basically it looks like I want the weight in the same hand as the side with the moving leg - right? Going back for another go at them this morning.

  16. #16

    Re: Help with SL RDL's.

    Quote Originally Posted by "ww4life" post=1006983
    But basically it looks like I want the weight in the same hand as the side with the moving leg - right?
    Short answer: Right.

    Longer answer: See this blog post from someone named Jules Erickson and this previous JP Fitness discussion for some thoughts on the various versions of the single-leg RDL.

    Note that while Erickson considers the two-arm one-leg version (a dumbbell or kettlebell in both hands) to be the most challenging because you can use more weight, the progression I'm following in Cook & Jones' Kettlebells from the Center - Dynami has me beginning with the double-KB version as "training wheels" for the contralateral version because the rotational challenge comes less into play with the double-KB version.

    Note also that one participant in the previous JP Fitness discussion finds the ipsilateral version more difficult than the contralateral version.

    I'm far from an expert, but I would tentatively venture that doing the contralateral version would be the wisest course. For one thing, that's the version described in NROL for Abs, so you'd be following the book. Also the reason Cook & Jones give for using the contralateral version in Dynami is that it comports with the way the body is organized into cross-linkages. The fascia connects the glutes to the opposite lat (left glute to right lat, right glute to left lat). These fascial X's support how we walk and run (the arms swing contralaterally to the leg movement) and climb. It is because of how these cross-body linkages support stride mechanics that Jeff O'Connor, in the Dynami manual, says that the "Contralateral SLDL must be included in any program."

    Also, I'd do them in bare feet or socks, and not in shoes, for the reasons given in the previous JP Fitness thread that I linked to at the beginning of my post.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •