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Thread: old age over 65 modifications

  1. #1

    old age over 65 modifications

    Do I need to modify some of the exercises? Specifically, I'm concerned about box jumps. Will they put too much stress on my heart?

  2. #2
    Senior Member LisaS's Avatar
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    old age over 65 modifications

    In my non-professional opinion, it isn't about age at all. It all depends on you and your current level of fitness. Why would you have a particular concern for your heart because of box jumps? Or do you have a different specific concern for your heart? Or your legs?

    Remember, it isn't as if you have to use a 24" box. You could go with a 4" box or just do jumps in place after all.

  3. #3

    old age over 65 modifications

    Quote Originally Posted by "LisaS":3a7lujxd
    In my non-professional opinion, it isn't about age at all. It all depends on you and your current level of fitness. Why would you have a particular concern for your heart because of box jumps? Or do you have a different specific concern for your heart? Or your legs?

    Remember, it isn't as if you have to use a 24" box. You could go with a 4" box or just do jumps in place after all.
    I'm concerned about my heart because that is what could kill me. Your heart rate goes down as you age, that's why for cardio there is a factor that accounts for age. Anybody can get their heart rate very high quite quickly, that's why there are always deaths that result from shoveling snow. I picked box jumps, but burpees are even worse. I had trouble with them when I was 14.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lou Schuler's Avatar
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    old age over 65 modifications

    Tony, it's a training program with a comprehensive warm-up protocol. You're doing about 20 minutes' worth of mobility and core exercises before you begin the power exercise.

    That's very different from untrained individuals who wake up in the morning, throw on boots and a coat, go out and start doing strenuous exercise with no preparation at all.

    I haven't researched this in a while, but the last time I looked, there were hardly any cases of people collapsing during strength workouts. There are certainly cases of strength workouts collapsing on people, like the ones who work out at home and drop a barbell on their trachea during a bench press, but heart attacks during strength training are pretty rare.

    The part of strength training that's traditionally been considered dangerous is the breath holding during heavy squats and deadlifts. But the people who lift the most and need to hold their breath the longest (it creates intra-abdominal pressure that protects the spine) are also the ones with the most training, and thus the least susceptible to that kind of cardiac event.

    I've never heard of a heart attack from jumping, but I'm sure there's at least one case study somewhere. It just seems highly improbable, given that it's not a continuous exertion that would chronically raise your blood pressure for minutes at a time. It's a short series of momentary exertions, which to the best of my knowledge have never been associated with cardiovascular risk.

  5. #5
    DavidJ
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    old age over 65 modifications

    As a lifter who just turned 63 I also was concerned about the effects of heavy exercise on my heart. I got myself checked out by a cardiologist and had a cardiac stress test. You get all wired up and they put you on a treadmill. They increase speed and grade quickly (a hell of a lot quicker than you ever would in a gym) and tell you to yell when you can't take anymore. MY heart rate was 165 when I gave up. Turned out it wasn't my lungs or chest pain that caused me to quit; it was my legs.
    I have a RHR of 45 and wear a monitor in the gym just so I can keep my HR in the 125-135 range when lifting and drop down to 110 between sets. If I hit 140 I tend to back off because I know it isn't really doing me any good.

    After the stress test I stopped worrying about my heart. Now I just worry about all of those little pulls and tweaks that I accumulate after some of the more horrendous NROL sets.

  6. #6
    DavidJ
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    old age over 65 modifications

    I should have added to my previous post that ... if you are concerned about your heart, get yourself checked out. Have a stress test and a ultrasound analysis to make sure all your valves are valving and arteries are pumping. If they find something out of wack they can probably fix it and if they don't that is one less thing to worry about.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Lou Schuler's Avatar
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    old age over 65 modifications

    David, why are you worried about a heart rate of 140 when it's only 85% of your max? I've read that race-car drivers compete for hours at a time with their heart rate averaging 90%.

    I've never heard that a momentary spike to 85% of your MHR is dangerous for an otherwise healthy person.

  8. #8
    DavidJ
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    old age over 65 modifications

    I don't see a risk in having a HR >140 during a session but is there a real benefit in doing so?

    I would appreciate your thoughts on the benefits of training at a HR that is 85-90% of max.

    The greatest benefit (for me at least) of using a HR monitor is at the lower end of HR. When I see my HR drop below 115 between sets it motivates me to start the next set.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Lou Schuler's Avatar
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    old age over 65 modifications

    David, although it's not my area of expertise, I've never quite understood why people use a HR monitor during strength training.

    You can use your breathing as a guide. When it returns to normal, it's time to start the next set. (We had a good discussion about rest intervals on this thread.)

    I wrote an article about max-heart-rate training quite a few years ago, and I can't guarantee my memory is perfect or that the information still stands up. That said:

    What I recall reporting back then is that a low MHR is one of several cardiovascular risk factors, along with low heart-rate variability (the non-uniformity of individual heartbeats, as measured by EKG; you don't want them all to be exactly the same) and a slow recovery from a maximum exertion.

    A cardiologist told me it's not possible to increase your MHR with training. It is what it is. But it's very possible to lower your MHR by not training. That is, unless you use the upper range of your cardiovascular power, you lose it.

    Same with your ability to recover. The longer it takes, the less fit you are.

    That's why it's always made sense to me to push up toward your MHR and then let it drop down, as you do during all the workouts Alwyn writes these days. You're training two important cardiovascular qualities: maximum capacity, and recovery from a maximum effort.

    I believe that if you train those qualities, your heart-rate variability should improve as well, or at least stay at a healthy level.

  10. #10
    DavidJ
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    old age over 65 modifications

    Thanks for the response Lou.
    What I take from all this is that I should up the ante and work harder. I tend to pace myself by keeping my HR between 120 and 140 to have enough energy to get through the entire workout.

    I am at the 8th workout for NROL Hypertrophy 1 so I think I'll push the intensity a bit for the remainder of Hyp 1 and see what comes of it.

  11. #11
    BridgetLelay
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    old age over 65 modifications

    http://www.jobs.net/Article/CB-38-Ta...vate-Patients/

    This article really helped me with clients not have any unrealistic goals. You sound like you just want to be healthier and fiter in general; this usually applies more to weight lighting.

    http://www.jobs.net/Article/CB-38-Ta...vate-Patients/

  12. #12
    expatInsurance
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    old age over 65 modifications

    I am now getting convinced that age is just a number, just listen to your body and do your work outs accordingly.

  13. #13
    Roark Haver
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    old age over 65 modifications

    Tony23, have you had any discussions with your doctor regarding your concerns about max heart rate? That might be a good place to start, as well as generally consulting with one before starting a fitness program.

    Better to be safe than sorry, and they can examine/screen you to address your specific concerns.

  14. #14
    Roark Haver
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    old age over 65 modifications

    I would also add that, if your doctor gives you the thumbs up, go for it. Using your body will help keep it young. I feel that we get "old" because sometimes we tell ourselves "I'm too old to try that" and it becomes self fullfilling. Our bodies can do a lot more work than we think they can.

  15. #15

    old age over 65 modifications

    Quote Originally Posted by "Roark Haver":2g9v9vei
    Tony23, have you had any discussions with your doctor regarding your concerns about max heart rate? That might be a good place to start, as well as generally consulting with one before starting a fitness program.

    Better to be safe than sorry, and they can examine/screen you to address your specific concerns.
    I've discussed my concerns with my doctor. He just told me to start walking. Start with 5 minutes and add a minute a week. I'm up to 9 minutes. About weight lifting, he just said "don't use heavy weights" I've had a Holtor monitor test and though I have several arrhythimias, none are serious.

  16. #16
    Roark Haver
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    old age over 65 modifications

    Have you considered working with a certified trainer or physical therapist? You may be able to find one that can write a program, and progressions, based on your specific needs/concerns.

    BTW, if you are concerned about heavy weights, read an article by Alwyn Cosgrove called "Your Body is a Barbell". It is a body weight exercise program that gives a fantastic workout. Here is a link to one of the places you can find it.

    http://articles.elitefts.com/trainin...ls-no-problem/

  17. #17

    old age over 65 modifications

    Quote Originally Posted by "tony23":200ditvg
    I've discussed my concerns with my doctor. He just told me to start walking. Start with 5 minutes and add a minute a week. I'm up to 9 minutes. About weight lifting, he just said "don't use heavy weights" I've had a Holtor monitor test and though I have several arrhythimias, none are serious.
    Have you checked out Mahler's training log for some heavy inspiration? He lifts heavier than many half his age.

    And, for some female inspiration...Faith Ireland.

  18. #18

    old age over 65 modifications

    Quote Originally Posted by "Roark Haver":27g1my1s
    Have you considered working with a certified trainer or physical therapist? You may be able to find one that can write a program, and progressions, based on your specific needs/concerns.

    BTW, if you are concerned about heavy weights, read an article by Alwyn Cosgrove called "Your Body is a Barbell". It is a body weight exercise program that gives a fantastic workout. Here is a link to one of the places you can find it.

    http://articles.elitefts.com/trainin...ls-no-problem/
    I've already had three bouts with PT's for back problems. Though you have a good idea about working with a PT, but since I have chronic fatigue syndrome it would be very difficult since I never know when I'm going to be too tired to exercise. With a PT, I'd have to schedule an appointment. I work out at a 24/7 place. I may give it a try though when the weather warms up. I'm no longer concerned about with lifting heavy weights with the info that Lou provided me. I'll still take a look at Cosgrove's book. Thanks for the reply.

  19. #19

    old age over 65 modifications

    Quote Originally Posted by "expatInsurance":3e75x1kv
    I am now getting convinced that age is just a number, just listen to your body and do your work outs accordingly.
    Like!

    While I get the reason for doing box jumps, my knees, well, they don't like those. So, I do them on the bosu ball. Less impact.

    When it comes to nutrition and weight loss and maintaining, and fitness, I have 2 loves!

    Weight Watchers, works for me, it gives me freedom to make choices within the healthy guide lines that work for my body.

    The New Rules books and workouts, also give me the flexibility to do the best I can, but if it hurts, don't do it.

    I can honestly say, that after years, and years, I have found the balance, between good nutrition and exercise that works for me!

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